Sunday, 27 May 2012

TWO INTERVIEWS: CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL



CREEDENCE CLEARWATER
REVISITED: BAD
MOON RISING (AGAIN)

“Bad Moon Rising”, “Proud Mary”, Up Around The Bend”,
Andrew Darlington investigates the latest incarnation of classic
Rock band CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL,
asks why John Fogerty is suing, and what angry young
New Wavers The Cars are doing involved in the project...? 



Before you ask, no. Creedence Clearwater Revisited are not a tribute band.

For a space on the precipice at the sixties end, Creedence Clearwater Revival were just about the hottest Rock band on the planet. At a time when there was a tedious drift towards maudlin country, or towards involved improvisational solos CCR slammed back with a run of hard-edged singles characterised by driving guitar riffs, churning rhythms and tight catchy-as-hell songs. Creedence Clearwater Revival, of course, is John Fogerty. His songs. His voice. ‘Creedence’ taken from a friend’s name. ‘Clearwater’ from a TV Beer ad. And ‘Revival’, as a manifesto of back-to-basics intent. The core was songwriter John and brother Tom Fogerty. But that’s not the whole story. Fogerty may have been the maverick genius. But the band were propelled by the faultless rhythm duo of Stu Cook and Doug ‘Cosmo’ Clifford who provide the tight support structure. It’s their driving mood-sensitive rhythm section that powers Creedence. There from the very start. It’s Doug’s drums and Stu’s bass you hear on all those ‘Creedence Gold’ (1972) hits compilations, on the ‘Forrest Gump’ soundtrack, and over the chilling comedic opening sequences of ‘An American Werewolf In London’. It was that line-up which held fast throughout the hits – “Bad Moon Rising”, “Proud Mary”, “Up Around The Bend” and the rest. Then – they were there at the very end, following Tom Fogerty’s departure, clear through to the final split in 1972. So it’s only natural that it’s Stu and Cosmo powering Creedence Clearwater Revisited, on their current tours, and on their highly listenable ‘Recollection’* (1998) album which features a wealth of new takes on old Creedence hits, recorded live across three nights in Alberta, Canada.

So what’s this new incarnation’s current relationship with John Fogerty…?

‘With John Foe-gart-y…? There is no relationship. John is suing us!’ There’s a tense moment of dead silence, as though I’ve asked an inappropriate question, until ‘yeah. It’s a real pain in the ass – right, because all we’re about is celebrating HIS music, as well as the band’s, you know? We put ‘Revisited’ together so Doug and I could play Creedence music for Creedence fans, before we got too old to travel, ha-ha-ha! That’s the whole premise of this project. And I think it does great honour to the original band, it celebrates the music in a very late-nineties way. And right now, with the release of this CD many more doors have begun to swing open for us. So yeah, he’s suing us, and it’s a tremendous waste, but whatever he’s doing, it’s not slowing us down.’

Stu is the geeky-looking guy in specs and poodle-cut hair on all those old album covers, beside the huge and massively bearded ‘Cosmo’. Only difference now is ‘I’ve got less hair, and more weight, ha-ha-ha!’ Fogerty met Cooke and Clifford at school – Portola Junior High to be exact, in blue-collar El Cerrito, California, and even before John’s older brother Tom expanded the line-up to a four-piece they were playing garage-band Rock ‘n’ Roll together as a teen trio. It was that unchanged and unchanging personnel which played all the seedy Bay Area Bars and Clubs as the Blue Velvets before signing to Fantasy and recording – first as the Golliwogs, and finally as Creedence Clearwater Revival. And while the rest of the world was going through its most indulgent Hippie-Trippy phase CCR were reaching out for the future, by way of the past, by plugging their gutsy ‘Swamp-Rock’ directly into their Blues and R&B roots. ‘Yes. Our format was based on the single record. The three-minute 45rpm single. When we were learning and first turning on to music, we grew up listening to that. There weren’t any ‘albums’, except for collections of singles. No-one made CONCEPT albums! So – to us, the best approach was not to be indulgent. We rehearsed a lot, and we didn’t waste much time in the studio. We just went for it. We played the stuff pretty much live, what you hear is basically live takes, just the four of us, Rocking! Initially our approach was to get the job done in two or three minutes. We had the end-product in mind, rather than the ‘Summer of Love’ approach ...although I mean, we later became as indulgent as anybody, ha-ha-ha. But there’s really nothing about the music that would demand a much more in-depth approach. It’s pretty straight-ahead. I tell you, John’s vocals on “Travellin’ Band” are unreal, off the planet, and the band is rocking too. That’s as REAL as it gets. Even today, that may still be – like, one of the best vocals ever.’

Fogerty’s three-minute visions conjured up a mythic America that felt timeless, but with an apocalyptic bad-acid edginess that chimed with the violent unease of the Vietnam War years. And Creedence were considered sufficiently a part of the scene to play ‘Woodstock’. ‘Yeah-yeh, we headlined Saturday night, but because we were not included in the Movie or on the soundtrack album, most people don’t even realise we were ever there! It’s a shame. My band didn’t FIT INTO that scene in the classical sense, but it wasn’t like we were totally outside of it either. We came from the same San Francisco Bay area as The Grateful Dead, Quicksilver (Messenger Service), Janis (Joplin), Jefferson Airplane. I lived in the Bay area when this was all happening. So we were a part of it to some extent whether we wanted to be or not, just because of the timing and the geographical proximity. We played the same ballrooms, the Fillmore Auditorium, and Winterland – it’s just that we had a different approach. I enjoyed the music scene that was going on, it’s all part of my musical experience. I saw Frank Zappa & The Mother Of Invention at the Fillmore. The other act on the bill was Otis Redding. It was a postponed show, because they were originally planned to play the day Martin Luther King was assassinated. And as a result they rescheduled the show and held it the following week. And I remember sitting on the floor – and just loving Otis Redding so much, and being so BORED by Frank Zappa. It was just too MENTAL, as if it was designed to challenge my attention-span. Whereas with Otis there was nothing contrived or planned about that. It was just pure Soul Music. Otis Redding was the best you could get. As REAL as it gets.’ The story says a lot about Creedence. With them, it’s always emotional intensity over artiness. Energy over artifice.

And ‘Real’ is the greatest compliment in Stu’s vocabulary. ‘It’s that quality people recognise in ‘Revisiteds’ music too’ he adds. ‘And now, with this new product we’re already starting to get attention from promoters, so we might be back touring Europe – the UK and Ireland, as early as 1999. But for sure by 2000. We’re very proud of our album, production-wise it’s a great recording, and there’s some fine performances. Elliot Easton – our guitar player (formerly of Punky New Wavers The Cars), really jumps on this material, and he has three pretty long extended solo’s on “Suzie Q”, “Run Through The Jungle” and “Heard It Through The Grapevine” – that’s a seventeen-minute version now, ha-ha-ha. The DEFINITIVE Creedence version of it. John Tristao, the lead vocalist is just fantastic with this material, his “Long As I Can See The Light” is an excellent version, and “I Put A Spell On You”. And we’ve added a fifth member – Steve Gunnar to overdub keyboards, harmonica, percussion and acoustic guitar. He helps add an extra dimension and fills out the sound of the performance in the live situation.’

But wait, isn’t the fusion of Creedence Clearwater with bratty upstarts The Cars, a bizarre combination? ‘It is, on the surface’ he admits agreeably. ‘But you know, if you listen to the Cars records, you hear Elliot just rip off the perfect eight-bar solo. And to me, that was my favourite part of the Cars. I never cared much for the Cars. I liked that they were a very different-sounding band. But without Elliot, I don’t think I’d have been that interested in them. The rest of their sound – the keyboards and synthesizers, is very cold and not very accessible. But Elliot’s playing just puts in that Rockabilly hard-Rock ‘n’ Roll kind-of distorted guitar thing. He makes it organic. Elliot’s roots are the same musical roots as ours too. Urban and Country Blues are some of his first influences – as well as CREEDENCE! When he was much younger, ‘Bayou Country’ (January 1969) and ‘Green River’ (August 1969) were a couple of his favourite albums, y’know, and fronting some of his own early bands they played some Creedence songs…’

Full circle. Creedence Clearwater Revival as the memory. ‘Recollected’ and ‘Revisited’ as the new manifesto of intent. But isn’t that two too many re-re-re’s? The last occasion the original line-up of John, Tom (who died in 1990), Stu and Doug played together was for a one-off school reunion gig – in El Cerrito, in 1983. But now, although the vocals may lack something of the bite and energy of Fogerty’s original, Creedence Clearwater Revisited remain the closest thing to ‘real’ we’re likely to get. ‘We’re not doing anything other than what people seem to want’ Stu persists. ‘If the fans didn’t appreciate the ‘Revisited’ project we’d put it on the shelf. But there’s tremendous positive feedback and enthusiasm about it. So we see no reason to stop or change anything.’

Original version published in:
‘ROCK ‘N’ REEL no.32: Spring 1999’ (UK - April 1999)



CREEDENCE
CLEARWATER
RECOLLECTED

Bass-player Stu Cook was a founder member of
CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL.
He was with them on all their hit singles and classic albums.
Now he – and original drummer Doug ‘Cosmo’ Clifford
are touring and recording with a new Creedence line-up.
Despite litigation from John Fogerty!
Andrew Darlington investigates… 

Creedence Clearwater Revival split in 1972. This is Creedence Clearwater Revisited. A band put together by original drummer and bass player Doug ‘Cosmo’ Clifford and Stu Cook, to tour and record on the strength of their still very-much-in-demand back-catalogue. John Fogerty, needless to say, doesn’t figure in the equation. But any doubts about the wisdom of the project should be placed on hold, says Stu – at least until their live album is given fair consideration. ‘You haven’t heard it yet, huh? Oh – that’s too bad. You should have a good listen to the CD. It’s just a superb album from beginning to end. We’re very proud of it. You think you can get it before you write your piece?’ He oozes genuine concern during our initial encounter.

When the original group were getting it together and playing Clubs and Bars around the San Francisco Bay area, as variously the Golliwogs or The Blue Velvets, they were John Fogerty alongside Doug, and Stu. Later there was Fogerty’s brother Tom as well. Soon – as the hippie bubble burst at the tail end of the Sixties, Creedence Clearwater Revival were dominating world charts with hits like “Bad Moon Rising”, “Green River”, “Sweet Hitch-Hiker”, “Proud Mary” and “Travellin’ Band”. Eight American Top Ten singles in just two years, with a lean brand of blue-collar Rock and R&B. Everything you now think of as the Kings Of Leon, CCR did first, and better. Glory days now recreated with sometimes uncanny authenticity, and other times with new twists on old formulas, on the live ‘Recollection’* album from their current ‘Revisited’ band. Now ‘I’m calling from my home at Lake Tahoe, Nevada’ Stu begins, with an easy and relaxed telephone-interview style. And in response to my next enquiry ‘you’re looking at an old picture? Well, now I’ve got less hair, and more weight, ha-ha-ha!’

Q: Can you talk me through the current album? It’s done live... Q: Yes, it is, it’s totally live. ‘Recollected’ is made up of three concerts performed in Alberta, Canada, about the middle of November (1997). They’re all complete songs. We took the best takes from each evening. Mostly we had three to choose from, but some nights – because of technical problems, we only had two options. But we just went with the best one, and made a complete set. A complete show. I think it does great honour to the original band, and it celebrates the music in a very late-nineties way. You should check out our new version of “Suzie Q”. And “I Put A Spell On You”. “Long As I Can See The Light” is an excellent version too. Give it a FULL listen, and see if you don’t agree that Doug and I – and our band, have done a fantastic job of celebrating the music and recreating the sound.

It’s all familiar material, you haven’t added to the repertoire. It’s all material recorded by the CCR quartet. We don’t play any material recorded by the trio, because Doug and I don’t feel that represents Creedence work at all (Tom Fogerty quit the group in 1972, and they subsequently recorded the final Creedence album, ‘Mardi-Gras’ (April 1972) as a trio). And no, there’s nothing on this record that’s new – except for our performance! Mainly, it’s a great recording production-wise, the sound is very good, and there’s some great performances. Elliot Easton – our guitar player (formerly of The Cars), really jumps on this material, and he has three pretty long extended solo’s on “Suzie Q”, “Heard It Through The Grapevine” and “Run Through The Jungle”. John Tristao, the lead vocalist (and rhythm guitar) is just fantastic with this material, and we’ve added a fifth member – Steve Gunnar to overdub keyboards and harmonica, percussion and acoustic guitar. He helps fill out the sound of the live performance.

Is it still good working live? Ah – that’s the whole premise of this project, Andy. We put it together so Doug and I could play Creedence music for Creedence fans, before we got too old to travel, ha-ha-ha! We’ve toured Europe twice now, in 1996 when we played Scandinavia, Germany and Spain. And this year (1998) when we did Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania... and Germany, twenty-two shows in thirty-one days. Our tours were mainly based on where CCR is the most popular. Creedence stuff stills sells, like, two million CD’s a year. But current sales of the old catalogue in the UK or Ireland, Spain, France or Switzerland show that we don’t sell as much THERE as we do in Scandinavia and Germany. So we haven’t made it to the UK yet, but right now, with the release of this CD many more doors have begun to swing open for us, and we’re already getting attention from promoters, so we might be back as early as 1999. But for sure by 2000.

You and Doug started out, with John Fogerty, as early as 1959, going on to record seven Beatles-style singles as The Golliwogs (between 1965-67), including one called “Brown Eyes Girl”. Was that the Van Morrison song? No. No it’s not, it’s a completely different song actually.

People associate Creedence with John Fogerty’s songs, but your first American hit single (as CCR) was a cover of Dale Hawkins’ “Suzie Q”, a version spread over both sides of the record as Part one and Part two. The album it came from – ‘Creedence Clearwater Revival’ (July 1968) also included Screaming Jay Hawkins’ “I Put A Spell On You”, and other old R&B songs. While cover versions were to remain an important part of your set. Correct. And again, “I Heard It On The Grapevine” (the original eleven-minute CCR version is on the July 1970 ‘Cosmos’s Factory’ album) was a cover of a Motown classic, a (Norman) Whitfield (Barret) Strong song.

Once you broke through commercially, particularly with the ‘Bayou Country’ album (January 1969), the press labeled you ‘Swamp Rock’. Even though you come from California, which is hardly noted for its swampy terrain! Well, you know, the media will eventually put a label on you no matter what you do. And they never paid any attention to where we were from. The music sounded like ‘Swamp Rock’ or ‘Louisiana Bayou’ to them and so that label just stuck. I guess we should be happy that we at least have a label, huh?

There must have been a strong collective bond within Creedence, as you maintained a constant line-up throughout the band’s lifetime. There were no changes. Not ‘till Tom Fogerty departed in ‘72, no. And – honestly, we rehearsed a lot, and we didn’t waste much time in the studio. We just went for it. What you hear is live takes, basically. We played the stuff pretty much live. You know, the vocals and the lead guitar were obviously done again, or added later. But the band playing the music is THE BAND! That was just the four of us rocking. So there’s nothing, there’s really nothing about the music that would demand a much more in-depth approach, I don’t think. It’s pretty straight-ahead.

At the time you emerged the scene was dominated by Hippie indulgence, experimentation and long meandering solo’s, whereas you were very much against that, you stuck very much to traditional Rock value. Yes. Quite a lot... but our approach was more with the end-product in mind, rather than the ‘Summer of Love’ approach. That, and – you know, our format was based on the single record. The three-minute 45rpm single. That was the approach we took. That was what we grew up listening to, when we were learning, and first turning on to music. There weren’t any ‘albums’, except for collections of singles. No-one made a CONCEPT album! So – to us, the best approach was not to be indulgent. Initially the approach was to try and get the job done in two or three minutes, and not to... although I mean, we later became as indulgent as anybody, ha-ha-ha.

But you toured on the same bill as all the big Hippie bands. Did you socialise and fit right in with those other musicians? Right. Right. The Grateful Dead, Quicksilver (Messenger Service), Janis (Joplin), Jefferson Airplane. We all came from the same area, the San Francisco Bay area. So yeah, I thought so, I lived in the Bay area when this was all happening. And even though my band didn’t FIT IN in the classical sense, I was able to personally enjoy all the music scene that was going on. All that has become part of my musical experience. And I think Doug too. And to an extent, Tom. I don’t know about John. But, whether we wanted to be a part of it or not, we were a part of it to some extent just because of the timing and the geographical proximity. So, y’know, we were there. We played the Ballrooms many times. We played the Fillmore, and Winterland – so, I mean, it wasn’t like we were totally outside of the scene. It’s just that we had a different approach to it.

It must be impossible to pick out one memory from that time, or a memory of one musician or band you played with, but could you try? When you played with Zappa perhaps (at the Denver Pop Festival – 27th June 1969)? You know, I don’t know if we ever did play with Zappa. But I saw Zappa at the Fillmore Auditorium. The other act on the bill was Otis Redding. It was a postponed show. A rescheduled show, because they were originally planned to play, but on that day Martin Luther King was assassinated. And so they postponed the show, and I think held it the following week. And I remember sitting on the floor – and just loving Otis Redding so much, and being so BORED by Frank Zappa. It was just too MENTAL. I think a lot of it was designed to challenge my attention-span. Whereas with Otis there was nothing contrived or planned about that. It was just pure Soul Music. The best. Otis Redding was the best you could get.

You also played on the same bill as Little Richard, didn’t you (at the Atlanta City Festival – 1st August 1969)? I don’t recall playing with too many of older guys. Maybe we might have done a TV show or some kind of a gathering with him, y’know – a Festival or something. But I do remember once we played with Howlin’ Wolf, at one of our early early shows in Southern California. It was wonderful for us because that was... that kind of Chicago Blues music, was pretty important to us. It goes right to our musical roots as well. To actually play with him was just fantastic. And we actually got to hook up with a lot of our heroes. Johnny Cash, the Everly Brothers, Rick Nelson were all people we actually got to meet along the way, and sometimes perform with. The stuff that we grew up on. So – those are great moments.

I’m intrigued by the story behind your excellent single “Travellin’ Band” (a US no.2 in March 1970), lyrically it’s an autobiographical account of your life-style as musicians in a touring Rock band... but then Little Richard sued you over the song (a suit claiming it plagiarised “Good Golly Miss Molly”). Yes, well – it was his publishers that sued actually. I don’t believe it was Little Richard himself. But there’s always the fine line between a ‘lift’ – when you’re stealing, and a tribute. I mean, obviously the song was meant as a tribute to Little Richard. But his business people felt that it was too derivative, and so that always messes up what should be a good thing. Sometimes the business gets in the way and it becomes a sour thing. But I tell you, John’s vocal on that record is unreal, off the planet. That – today, may still be – like, one of the best ever vocals. And the band is rocking too. That’s as REAL as it gets.

There’s now a huge backlog of covers of CCR songs, from Hanoi Rocks (“Up Around The Bend”), to Tina Turner (“Proud Mary”), to a recent electro-Dance version of “Long As I Can See The Light”. Oh yeah? I’d like to hear that one.

One journalist at the time suggested that, because of your intuitive feel for the kind of R&B-based Rock ‘n’ Roll he seemed to have become alienated from, CCR should kidnap Elvis Presley and record an album with him. That never happened. But the next best thing, Elvis did record “Proud Mary”, a song you had a part in creating. He did, yeah. We actually went to see Elvis the night he played it, and he dedicated it to us. He knew we were in the audience. I think it was the Oakland Coliseum, a big big place. And yes – it’s certainly ‘another-world’ experience. At the time it was just amazing that we even had a career of our own y’know, ha-ha-ha – to be honest with ya! We were still pretty much overwhelmed by all that.

Since the break-up of the original band you’ve all been involved in various projects. Tom in Real Estate (until his death from tuberculosis in September 1990). John in successful solo albums like ‘Centerfield (a US no.1 in 1985). While you’ve done production work, and played with Doug Sahm’s Tex-Mex Trip Band. Oh yeah – ‘Groovers Paradise’ (1974). That just ‘happened’, I don’t know how. A mutual friend introduced us to Doug Sahm. And he said ‘hey, you guys wanna play with me?’ And Doug (Clifford) said ‘hey, you looking for a producer?’ We owned a recording studio at the time, so it just kinda all fell together. That was the first album, subsequently Doug has made two additional albums with Doug Sahm – spaced over the last twenty years.

Movies have something to do with the continuing interest in Creedence music. You’re on the soundtrack to ‘Good Morning Vietnam’ (with Robin Williams, 1987). While “Bad Moon Rising” is used very effectively in the opening sequences of John Landis’ ‘An American Werewolf In London’ (1981) which is still shown regularly on TV. That was an excellent usage of it, y’know. And it was a successful film. That helps maintain awareness of the music, and spreads it to new fans as well. But that’s quite an old film actually. We had “Fortunate Son” in ‘Forrest Gump’ (1994). And a film called ‘The Big Lebowski’ (directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, 1998) has two Creedence songs in it. It’s the big hit domestically over here in the States this year – although I haven’t seen it yet. And I don’t know how it’s fared with overseas distributors. But we do get a lot of interest... and that’s where we get a lot of our new twenty-five-year-old and younger audience from. Sometimes between thirty to fifty-percent of the audience at ‘Revisited’ concerts wasn’t even born when we were recording, which is wonderful. When ‘Creedence Revisited’ started we had no idea of that tremendous amount of new fans, new enthusiasm.

There does seem to a high level of inter-generational awareness of music at this time. A Rolling Stones concert also seems to cut across age ranges. It’s exactly the same thing for us. We can’t... no-one can explain why this is happening. I mean, there’s lots of reasons, right? CD’s are a great part of it, the reissue of back-catalogues. Classic Rock Radio in the States too, where the kids can listen, and push a button if they don’t like a song. Or if they DO like a song. Kids like Creedence, the Who, the Doors, or Zeppelin, as much as their parents do. They know the music, and a lot of them know the words better than I do. Shocking!

The ‘Revisited’ fusion of Creedence Clearwater with Elliot Easton, formerly of bratty New Wave upstarts The Cars, seems a bizarre combination on paper. It does on the surface. But Elliot’s roots are the same musical roots as ours. When he was learning to play guitar he was listening to guys like Mississippi John Hurt and Robert Johnson – and so the Blues, Urban and Country Blues, are some of his first influences – as well as CREEDENCE! When he was much younger, ‘Bayou Country’ (January 1969) and ‘Green River’ (August 1969) were a couple of his favourite albums, and fronting some of his own early bands they played some Creedence songs. So anyway, he was introduced to me by a mutual friend and we developed somewhat of a relationship as friends before Doug and I started this project. So when we got around to putting names and faces together, Elliot was my first suggestion, and turned out to be our first choice.

The obvious final question concerns your current relationship with John Fogerty. With John? There is no relationship. John is suing us! Yeah – right, we don’t quite understand what he expects to gain from it, but it’s a tremendous waste and we’d be eager to see it behind us, but it’s his decision and he’s going to have to come to terms with the situation, and make that decision. Hopefully he’ll make the correct one. Whatever he’s doing, it’s not slowing us down. It’s a real pain in the ass, because all we’re about is celebrating HIS music, as well as the band’s, you know. We’re not doing anything other than what people seem to want. If the fans didn’t appreciate the ‘Revisited’ project we would certainly put it on the shelf and find something else to do. But from everything we’ve seen there’s tremendous feedback, positive feedback and enthusiasm about it. So we see no reason to stop or change anything that we’re doing.

Thanks for your time. Good speaking with ya, Andy. And hey – would you mind sending me a copy of what you write? Because I don’t know if I’ll be able to locate the publication in any kind of timely manner. I’d be glad to give you my mailing address…?


 *‘RECOLLECTION’ by CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVISITED (SPV 2CD 085-29232, US label Fuel 2000, June 1998) First album by Creedence Clearwater Revisited, consisting of material originally recorded by Creedence Clearwater Revival. Despite not charting well, the album was certified platinum September 19, 2007.
Doug Clifford (drums), Stu Cook (bass, vocals), Elliot Easton (lead guitar), Steve Gunner (keyboards, acoustic guitar, percussion, harmonica, vocals), John Tristao (lead vocals, rhythm guitar). Producers: Stu Cook and Doug Clifford at Varese Sarabande Records Inc
All songs written by John Fogerty unless otherwise stated.
Disc One: “Born On The Bayou” (5:20), “Green River” (3:23), “Lodi” (3:19), “Commotion” (2:41), “Who’ll Stop The Rain?” (2:38), “Susie Q” (Eleanor Broadwater, Dale Hawkins, Stanley Lewis - 10:10), “Hey Tonight” (2:36), “Long As I Can Seen The Light” (3:40), “Down On The Corner” (3:03), “Lookin’ Out My Backdoor” (2:44), “Cotton Fields” (Leadbelly – 3:21), “Tombstone Shadow” (3:56)
Disc Two: “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” (Norman Whitfield & Barrett Strong – 15:45), “Midnight Special” (traditional – 4:13), “Bad Moon Rising” (2:18), “Proud Mary” (3:23), “I Put A Spell On You” (Screamin’ Jay Hawkins – 4:36), “Fortunate Son” (2:48), “Have You Ever Seen The Rain” (2:44), “Travelin’ Band” (3:24), “Run Through The Jungle” (8:09), “Up Around The Bend” (3:52)

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